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 Forum index » Off-Topic Area » Security
Plug, Possible Anti-PRISM Storage Device
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nooby

Joined: 29 Jun 2008
Posts: 10557
Location: SwedenEurope

PostPosted: Mon 15 Jul 2013, 18:44    Post subject:  Plug, Possible Anti-PRISM Storage Device
Subject description: Hardware and software that cooperate to give you local storgate encrypted
 

Guys I am a noob so explain what it is about. I read and read
but feel unsure what it really is. Most likely it is for windows
because they never mention any OS?

But it allow you to share files with all usb compatible devices.
so a hardware that act as a cloud with help of software?

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/12/anti-prism-kickstarter-cloud-guys-corporation_n_3586427.html?utm_hp_ref=technology

Kickstarter maybe know more

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cloud-guys/plug-the-brain-of-your-devices
or the guys own site?
http://www.cloudguys.com/

So have fun getting what it is about. I trust the NSA will force them to give key to the encryption algorithm.

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jpeps

Joined: 31 May 2008
Posts: 3220

PostPosted: Mon 15 Jul 2013, 21:20    Post subject:  

We can already read media files directly from a thumb drive via a $2 connector and free software (Nexus 7) or simm card.

I wouldn't trust any 3rd party encryption service. The government could order a way to collect the data prior to encryption, and not tell you about it. The safest encryption is done at the user's end.

For file sharing, the plug device doesn't give you any file selection option for your devices (it does on a pc). Thus, all your files now get sent to a USB drive, which notoriously corrupt. They're also all now on the internet.

You can load an ftp server app on your device for free that turns it into a server with a click. Then you simply connect to it from any computer. Dropbox sharing is even simpler. If I was concerned about PRISM, I'd certainly encrypt anything I put on the internet first myself. I'd also put as little on the internet as possible.
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Sylvander

Joined: 15 Dec 2008
Posts: 3548
Location: West Lothian, Scotland, UK

PostPosted: Tue 16 Jul 2013, 04:00    Post subject:  

Is there any system of encryption that cannot be decrypted?

Remember the WW2 German Enigma machine that the Germans thought [with good reason] to be impossible to decrypt.
And yet the British, with help from the Poles, and French methinks, were able to to decrypt communications so encrypted.
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Barkin


Joined: 12 Aug 2011
Posts: 751

PostPosted: Tue 16 Jul 2013, 05:52    Post subject:  

Sylvander wrote:
Is there any system of encryption that cannot be decrypted?

That legislation like RIPA was necessary suggests to me that encryption exists which is uncrackable by UK government agencies: if all encryption had a backdoor the "give-us-the-passsword-or-you're-going-to-jail" legislation would be unnecessary ...
https://wiki.openrightsgroup.org/wiki/Regulation_of_Investigatory_Powers_Act_2000/Part_III

All passwords can be cracked by brute force, but if the password is sufficiently long and random it would take an unfeasibly long time ... https://www.grc.com/haystack.htm
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Karl Godt


Joined: 20 Jun 2010
Posts: 3982
Location: Kiel,Germany

PostPosted: Tue 16 Jul 2013, 07:59    Post subject:  

Long story short : While refreshing my memories about Enigma
- which I thought was cracked by the capture of U505 - until today Laughing - but that was 4th of June 1944 - two days before D-Day ,
I found this on wikipedia :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Fish
Quote:
Operation Fish was the World War II evacuation of British wealth from the UK to Canada. It was the biggest movement of wealth in history.[1]

Laughing
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Sylvander

Joined: 15 Dec 2008
Posts: 3548
Location: West Lothian, Scotland, UK

PostPosted: Tue 16 Jul 2013, 08:52    Post subject:  

Barkin wrote:
That legislation like RIPA was necessary suggests to me that encryption exists which is uncrackable by UK government agencies: if all encryption had a backdoor the "give-us-the-passsword-or-you're-going-to-jail" legislation would be unnecessary ..

Two thought regarding why they might do this even if it is not strictly necessary:
1. They need to make people [other national intelligence services?] think/believe that there are in existence methods of encryption that they are unable to decrypt.

2. It's also easier to be given the decryption code than expend valuable resources on decryption, which would counter-productively prove that it can be done.
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Barkin


Joined: 12 Aug 2011
Posts: 751

PostPosted: Tue 16 Jul 2013, 09:39    Post subject:  

Sylvander wrote:
... They need to make people [other national intelligence services?] think/believe that there are in existence methods of encryption that they are unable to decrypt.

Is the FBI also bluffing ?... http://news.techworld.com/security/3228701/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fifth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution#Computer_passwords
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Sylvander

Joined: 15 Dec 2008
Posts: 3548
Location: West Lothian, Scotland, UK

PostPosted: Tue 16 Jul 2013, 11:18    Post subject:  

Barkin wrote:
Is the FBI also bluffing ?...

Maybe yes, maybe no.
The FBI has certain capabilities, and there may be certain of those capabilities that they like to keep secret.

Then, neither the FBI nor the courts are at the top of the hierarchy.
I'm sure there are other organisations [further up the hierarchy] that have greater capabilities than both of those.
And organisations higher up keep secret from organisations lower down, certain key knowledge and techniques.

See for example deception operations [in this case from WW2]...
Particularly Operation Fortitude.
Where it is VITAL that even your own side is deceived.
Sometimes they even arrange for large numbers of their own to be killed/sacrificed to make good the deception.
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wibble


Joined: 10 Jul 2013
Posts: 77

PostPosted: Tue 16 Jul 2013, 12:53    Post subject:  

Regarding Enigma coding, this goes for all encoding/cypher systems.

You can have a very robust encryption method but the weakness in all these processes is the human element. (Typically users will either write down the encryption cypher settings, choose a easy cypher key, or repeatedly request the key..)

One of the reasons that the army enigma codes were so easy to crack compared to say the naval ones or T52 was that operators were lazy and failed to randomize the encryption seed properly at the start of the day so it was possible to guess what the code wheels were set to by the bofins at Bletchley park.

If your seed is bad, then its going to make cracking the cypher much easier.

Sometimes the encryption algorithm is just plan bad, (Japanese suffered from this.) but today encryption technology is at such a level that as has been already stated its very hard to brute force a encrypted data set unless your time to do the job is near infinite.

Governments might tell you that they have a back door to the state of the art encryption algos but thats a lie, if they did then nobody would be paranoid about releasing the state of the art encryption algos, or spending time with supercomputers cracking data sets (and even then you can only really do that with civilian grade algo's.)

example the first person to break public key encryption will be very rich, well consider how much of the modern world depends on this algorithm being impossible to crack.. banks, governments, ect.. business as we know it would ground to a halt if it were possible to crack the RSA encryption methods.

Probably its one of the main reason why there is such huge interest in prime number theory.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RSA_Factoring_Challenge
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