Puppy Linux Discussion Forum Forum Index Puppy Linux Discussion Forum
Puppy HOME page : puppylinux.com
"THE" alternative forum : puppylinux.info
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

The time now is Thu 23 Jan 2020, 07:40
All times are UTC - 4
 Forum index » House Training » Beginners Help ( Start Here)
Puppy and SSD with limited lifetime and capacity.
Moderators: Flash, Ian, JohnMurga
Post new topic   Reply to topic View previous topic :: View next topic
Page 1 of 2 [28 Posts]   Goto page: 1, 2 Next
Author Message
EEEpc_user

Joined: 13 Oct 2015
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Wed 14 Oct 2015, 08:42    Post subject:  Puppy and SSD with limited lifetime and capacity.  

Hello!

I have Asus EEE pc 901 netbook.

The properties are:
1) CPU Intel Atom 1.6 Ghz
2) SSD 1 - 4 Gb
3) SSD 2 - 8 Gb
4) 1024 gb RAM

I've spent a few days trying to figure out which linux-based distribution would fit it best and decided to try this one (tahrpup to be precise).

But I have a few problems related to hardware, maybe somebody can help me here:

1) SSD limited lifetime.

I have to minimize the amount of write operations. At the same time I wouldn't like to use the feature of loading everything into RAM. I'm planning to install some software and I suppose it'll fill up RAM entirely at some point, which I wouldn't like to happen. I'd rather save RAM for something else.

So, I suppose I'm left with 2 choices: Frugal install or Full install. Which one is better for SSD?

Also, any advice on how to prolong lifetime of SSD with tahrpup would be appreciated.

2) Limited space of SSD

So I have just 12 GB of space available. Moreover, I have to install OS to the 4 gb drive because trying to boot from the other one results in a failiure. I need to utilize all SSD space available for applications.

Spreading out applications across partitions and drives doesn't seem like an easy task, what would be the best solution here? Mounting a certain folder from OS drive (4gb) to the other one (8gb)?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
Burn_IT


Joined: 12 Aug 2006
Posts: 3625
Location: Tamworth UK

PostPosted: Wed 14 Oct 2015, 09:30    Post subject:  

Frugal will try to avoid the source media after loading - that is its point.
_________________
"Just think of it as leaving early to avoid the rush" - T Pratchett
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
EEEpc_user

Joined: 13 Oct 2015
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Wed 14 Oct 2015, 10:00    Post subject:  

What kind of files do you mean by "source media" ?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
Burn_IT


Joined: 12 Aug 2006
Posts: 3625
Location: Tamworth UK

PostPosted: Wed 14 Oct 2015, 10:30    Post subject:  

Puppy program files and anything in the save file.
The idea was that it loaded from a CD and then freed it up so that the drive could be used for other things.

_________________
"Just think of it as leaving early to avoid the rush" - T Pratchett
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
unicorn316386

Joined: 07 Apr 2015
Posts: 208
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Wed 14 Oct 2015, 10:57    Post subject:  

I have 1GB RAM and prefer frugal as well. You can disable saving to hard drive every 30 minutes and during shutdown in Menu -> System -> Puppy Event Manager and change Save Session time to 0, that way it will never write to hard drive unless you press Save icon yourself, or save to mnt/home. 1GB RAM with frugal is enough for me without any swapfile (OS uses <100MB).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
rokytnji

Joined: 20 Jan 2009
Posts: 2288

PostPosted: Wed 14 Oct 2015, 14:40    Post subject:  

I used to have the 4 gig /16 gig eeepc 900 celeron.

Unfortunately, all my documentation I made was lost when eeepc forums and MacPup original forums went defunct.

For Starters. If worried about those cheap Phison SSD drive longevity.
Format both the 4 gig and 8 gig ssd drives as ext2. Flag the 4 gig as "boot" while formatting it.

Do the frugal install on the 4 gig. Grub4dos goes on the mbr for the 4 gig.
The 1st save file can go on the the 4 gig.

The 8 gig is still empty. As you decide to install more applications and make bigger save files. You will need the

Code:
puppy pfix=ram


boot cheat in grub4dos menu so to make a new save file. Boot into that mode. Make it, the new save file, as big as you want. Save it to the 8 gig ssd. The 8 gig ssd should be mounted before shutdown before offering that save choice. There will be a icon on the desktop to mount it. It is easy.

When done. Next boot should give a choice of save files to load. Before proceeding with completing boot process.

You can worry about pup modes later on after you get everything dialed in and done. The phison ssd won't fly apart using the ext2 file system.

You will need to keep a live puppy usb around in case of improper power off or shutdowns though. As ext2 file system is unforgiving for improper unmounts. Like when the battery dies when you are running or what ever.

The live usb will fix that when you run gparted and run "check" on both 4/8 ext2 drives . It will also prompt you to unmount them if they are mounted for what ever reason before doing check. No /swap partition allowed either if worried about ssd lifetime on these phison drives.

Like I said. All my puppy linux documentation on eeepcs is gone.

Here is what mine used to look like
http://oi55.tinypic.com/xy8ew.jpg

That iso now comes from here.
https://archive.org/details/PuppyLinuxPuppeee

Good luck with it. I'd stick with tahrpup instead of what I showed above.
It is more current and requires less work to dial in for new users.
I was just strolling down memory lane for a second.

I hope You know you can boot and install and run Tahr pup on a


which probably has faster read and write speeds than those old cheap phison ssd asus put in those eeepcs.
Then use the internal ssd drives for what ever you want to store. Outside of the SD card. You can even do a frugal install to the 4 gig ssd. Use it to fix the 32gig sd card in case of improper unmounts. It Just takes a linux using scooter tramps imagination.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
8Geee


Joined: 12 May 2008
Posts: 2120
Location: N.E. USA

PostPosted: Wed 14 Oct 2015, 15:19    Post subject:  

Nice try with the SDHC. One problem there is the poor reader installed in the eee. Those postage stamps are slower than the US Mail. Of the two SSD's the 4Gb is of better quality and faster. The 8Gb is basically a turtle.

I would find a newer usb 2.0 stick, and boot from that. Now theres 12Gb in both SSD's plus left-over in the stick... unless using a newer Puppy with f2fs that fills the stick.

_________________
Linux user #498913 "Some people need to reimagine their thinking."
"Zuckerberg: a large city inhabited by mentally challenged people."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
EEEpc_user

Joined: 13 Oct 2015
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Wed 14 Oct 2015, 18:18    Post subject:  

Thanks for replies, especially rokytnji for a very detailed one! I'll follow your instructions and report. My plan is to use SSDs for now, and usb when they finally break.

I'd like to clarify if I understand everything correctly. First off all this:

rokytnji wrote:
puppy pfix=ram


Does that mean that if I use both 4 gb and 8 gb drives, I have to always choose the option of running Puppy totally in RAM?

rokytnji wrote:
Next boot should give a choice of save files to load


Let's say I install application 1 on 4 gb drive and application 2 on 8 gb. With this setup they won't be able to run simultaneously, correct?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
bigpup


Joined: 11 Oct 2009
Posts: 13190
Location: S.C. USA

PostPosted: Wed 14 Oct 2015, 19:48    Post subject:  

puppy pfix=ram is a boot option that tells Puppy to boot and not use the save file.
You only use it to do what it does.

Booting with this boot option is an easy way to make a new save file.
Normal shutdown will give you the option to make a save file, because you were not using one.

Normal boots, after you make a save file, will use the save file.

Normal boot-up of a frugal install using a save file.
The main Puppy files and programs will get loaded into ram.
The save file will get accessed as needed.

This info may help you:
Various ways to install puppy
http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?t=60302

Basics of installing program packages
http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?t=59597

_________________
The things they do not tell you, are usually the clue to solving the problem.
When I was a kid I wanted to be older.... This is not what I expected Shocked
YaPI(any iso installer)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
rokytnji

Joined: 20 Jan 2009
Posts: 2288

PostPosted: Wed 14 Oct 2015, 20:04    Post subject:  

Quote:
Let's say I install application 1 on 4 gb drive and application 2 on 8 gb. With this setup they won't be able to run simultaneously, correct?


Just try it out. You will see there is no way to run mutiple save save files on boot up.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
rokytnji

Joined: 20 Jan 2009
Posts: 2288

PostPosted: Wed 14 Oct 2015, 20:11    Post subject:  

Quote:
Those postage stamps are slower than the US Mail.


It is not on this netbook.

Code:
# inxi -M
Machine:   System: manda product: Intel powered classmate PC v: Gen 1.5L
           Mobo: N/A model: N/A
           Bios: American Megatrends v: CM94515A.86A.0024.2008.0715.1716 date: 07/15/2008
# inxi -f
CPU:       Single core Intel Atom N270 (-HT-) cache: 512 KB
           clock speeds: max: 1600 MHz 1: 1600 MHz 2: 1333 MHz
           CPU Flags: acpi aperfmperf apic arch_perfmon bts clflush cmov
           constant_tsc cx8 de ds_cpl dtes64 dtherm dts est fpu fxsr ht
           lahf_lm mca mce mmx monitor movbe msr mtrr nx pae pat pbe pdcm pebs
           pge pni pse sep ss sse sse2 ssse3 tm tm2 tsc vme xtpr


But is has been awhile since I owned a eeepc. I had a 900 and a 701SD at the same time. This netbook, is more better built than the Asus.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
mikeslr


Joined: 16 Jun 2008
Posts: 3614
Location: 500 seconds from Sol

PostPosted: Wed 14 Oct 2015, 20:54    Post subject: Filling in some details  

Hi EEEpc_user,

I hope you didn't take offense to BigPup's recommendation that you post your question here. As evidenced by his post on this thread, he, in fact, is one of the most frequent responders to posts by beginners. He made that suggestion because: (1) firstly, this is where the more seasoned fans look for problems newcomer's have; and (2) secondly, the Forum is already a Byzantine maze difficult to navigate. Unfortunately, the Forum's owner-administrator has, I've been told, semi-retired. He is kind enough to keep it up at his own expense; but no longer devotes time to move posts into some semblance of order. So we try as best we can to prevent the Forum from getting more complicated than it has to be.

Because of that condition, especially as a newcomer, you may find this webpage invaluable: http://wellminded.net63.net/ It is a google search engine dedicated to the Forum. Just plug in a couple of terms and it will respond with a list of links to every post dealing with them.

The following is long because (a) I assume you know nothing, and (b) later newcomers reading it may, in fact, know nothing.

As I understand your post, you have two requirements. The first is to avoid writing to your SSD's as much as possible. The second is to reduce the use of RAM as much as possible.

I agree with Burn_it and unicorn316386 that your first objective is best met by doing a Frugal Install. Although every change you make first takes place in RAM regardless of what operating system you use –Windows, Mac, Whatever-- changes do not become permanent until written to Storage – in your case one of your SSD drives. In a Full Install such changes are written behind the scenes much more frequently. As I understand it, with the exception of just viewing a document or a Webpage almost everything you do will generate a “Write to Storage”.

And I especially agree with the extended advice rokytnji has provided and would give serious consideration to 8Geee's suggestion that you acquire a large capacity USB stick. With your SSD's failing, its best to have your operating system on a medium which isn't.

With a Frugal Install, by default, writes to Storage will take place periodically. As unicorn316386 suggested, the default is every thirty minutes. But as he also suggested you can change this so that it only writes to Storage on your command. Barry Kauler, the creator of Puppy, devised this method initially for booting Pups from a USB-Stick because of concerns that only a limited number of writes to such media could be made before the Sticks became unreliable. But fans soon figured out how to set it up regardless of the media which holds a Frugal Install's files. The discussion on this thread explains in detail how to set that up: http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=662326#662326. The following is the procedure I'd use.

1. The first time you boot your Pup its First Run Dialog will start. Set you time zone, locale and make any display changes that may be (usually aren't) necessary. Setup your Wifi if necessary. Then Shutdown. You'll be asked if you want to create a SaveFile/Folder. I recommend SaveFile, especially since you want to avoid writing to media when possible.
2. Boot back into Pup. Open your File-Manager (I'll assume Rox) and browse to where your boot-loader is located. If you used Grub4dos you'll find a file named Menu.lst. If you aren't using Grub4dos, install it so as to replace your current boot-loader. You can install Grub4dos by clicking Menu>System>Grub4Dos bootloader config. When it opens select the SSD where your Pup is located. Grub4dos will install itself and create a Menu.lst for booting into any operating system it found on the computer. You'll be asked if you want to edit Menu.lst. I always select “Yes” in order to add a listing which enables me to boot into one Pup without loading the SaveFile. I'll explain that shortly.

But first you'll want to look at the line which starts with the word “kernel”. I'm not sure if Pup will treat your SSD drives as harddrives or USB-drives. If the latter, the “kernel” line will read something like:

kernel /tahr/vmlinuz psubdir=tahr pmedia=usbflash pfix=fsck

[The /tahr exists as my tahrpup files are in a folder named “tahr”. Ergo, also the argument psubdir=tahr, which speeds up Pup's locating those files.].

If that's the case, Pup is treating the SSD drive as a USB-stick and you don't have to do anything. But see below regarding adding the “nocopy” argument.

But it might read:

kernel /tahr/vmlinuz psubdir=tahr pmedia=atahd pfix=fsck

In that case, Pup is treating the SSD drive as a hard drive and you'll have to edit it to read something like:

kernel /tahr/vmlinuz psubdir=tahr pmedia=ataflash pfix=fsck

Yours won't have the bolding which I've done just to emphasize what might have to be changed. Don't “bold” the change if you have to make it.

As you also want to minimize what's being loaded into RAM, I'd add the nocopy argument to the kernel line, to wit: kernel ….. pfix=fsck,nocopy. Note, there's no space after the comma.

You need have little concern that Pup's will “use up your RAM.” For a layman's explanation of how a Frugal Install uses RAM to manage applications, see this post: http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=862192#862192. After writing it, I wondered if the “nocopy” argument still had any value. So I ran Lucid Revitalized both with and without that argument. With the argument, on bootup Lucid used about 100 Mbs less RAM than without it. In the above post I used Abiword as an example, explaining that while Pup probably loaded the entire Abiword application –which would require perhaps 15 Mbs-- for illustration purposes we were to assume that only three essential files were loaded. As far as I can tell, the “nocopy” argument, in fact, forces that only the essential files be loaded.

In short, your kernel line should read something like either:

kernel /tahr/vmlinuz psubdir=tahr pmedia=usbflash pfix=fsck,nocopy
or
kernel /tahr/vmlinuz psubdir=tahr pmedia=ataflash pfix=fsck,nocopy

[If possible, move your Pup's files to a folder before running Grub4dos– why explained later. But don't move the SaveFile while its in use. Boot without it, then move it].

Getting back to being able to boot without loading your SaveFile: While you're editing Menu.lst, scroll down to beyond the last line of Pup's listing and press Enter/Return a couple of time to create some space. Then scroll back to the top of that listing and, holding down the Left-Mouse-Button, drag it to the bottom of the listing. This should highlight the entire listing. Right-Click and select copy. Scroll to the empty space you created. Right-Click and select paste. Now scroll up to the “kernel” line and edit its ending from pfix=fsck to pfix=fsck,ram. That's , [comma] ram without a space in between. [fsck checks the file-system's integrity. RAM is the command not to load the SaveFile]. Now edit the title of this listing to include something like “Safe-mode” or “Without SaveFile”.

Being able to boot without loading the SaveFile enables you to (a) Create several SaveFiles that include different applications, booting into whichever you want; (b) boot into Pup even if something went wrong with your SaveFile; (c ) easily create a backup of your SaveFile, and (d) test applications on a “virgin” install.

Now that Puppy boots thinking your media is a USB-Stick, you can configure it to only Save Changes on Command. Click Menu>System>Puppy Event Manager and then click the Save Session Tab. You'll see a box next to the title “Save Interval”. Setting this to 0 will (a) prevent automatic saves and (b) add a icon to your desktop (on some Pups, your Menu) that you can click when you want changes to be Saved. There's also a radio button which when “checked” will ask at shutdown if you want to Save. I usually leave it checked. Sometime after making changes I get distracted and forget to manually Save. The prompt reminds me. Pup takes about 2 second after I click “No Save” to shut down.

If you configure a Pup not to automatically Save, and keep your datafiles outside of your SaveFile the only times you will have to manually Save are (a) You've changed Pup's or some application's setting, (b) you've installed a new pet, and (c) you've found an SFS you always want to load at bootup.

A Puppy can write to any media it can access. Consequently, there is rarely a good reason to save data to your SaveFile. For example, the first time your go to save an Abiword document, it will open its built in file-manager which you can use to browse to /mnt/home (sometimes appearing as /mnt/dev_save) and create a folder named “my-docs” within which to save the document. /mnt/home is your home partition. It is not in your SaveFile. If /mnt/home is on ssd1, you could also have created the folder on ssd2. Or on a USB-stick you had plugged in. With your document outside the SaveFile, the edits you make are saved via the application editing it as, and when, you want to save such edits.

With Automatic Save turned off, you can test whether a pet works or conflicts with other applications without making it a permanent part of your system. See the post referred to above. To test a pet without making it a permanent part of your system, install the pet –which is only installed to RAM until Saved-- and restart X: Menu>Logout>Restart X. This registers the application on you system enabling it to be tested.

Although Tahrpup should run fine on your system, I'd recommend that you try two other Pups which might run “lighter”: Lucid Revisited, Lupu-5.2.8.7-20150702.iso, which you can get here: https://www.mediafire.com/folder/y3rkzhjz0ooes/Disk_Images-5.2.8.7

and

Carolina-Vanguard, which you can get the link here: http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=814591#814591

Once you have any Pup running, testing another Pup is easy if you are using Grub4dos as boot-loader.

1. Running your Pup, start your file-manager and browse to one of your SSD drives or a USB-Stick. Right-Click an empty space and select New>directory and give it a unique name.
2. Download an ISO. Left-Click the ISO to mount/open it.
3. Copy the following files from the ISO-Window to the folder you created: initrd(xx), vmlinuz, and every file which ends with .sfs, .2fs, .3fs or .4fs. To copy files you can left-click-hold then drag it to the new location and select copy. But you can copy multiple files simultaneously by either left-clicking an empty space and then dragging the mouse cursor over a couple of files, left-click-hold one file to highlight it, then while holding down the Ctrl-key, doing the same to others, or by using the first method, then the second. Left-Clicking a highlighted file while holding down the Ctrl-key will also de-select it.
4. Left-Click the ISO to unmount/close it.
5a. Run Grub4dos. It will create a new Menu.lst which will include both your old and new Pups. But you'll have to make the changes discussed above regarding “nocopy”, no Automatic Save and booting without loading a SaveFile; or
5b. Open Menu.lst in your text editor (probably geany) [just left-click the file] and add a listing for your new Pup making certain (a) your spelling and punctuation are correct, (b) the partition on which the new Pup is located is correctly identified > easiest if your old and new Pups are on the same partition/drive, (c) its folder's name is correctly spelled, and its initrd is correctly spelled. Most initrd's have no endings. Some end with gz, some with xz.

The Package Managers of both Lucid Revitalized and Carolina-Vanguard provide access to a wealth of applications. Other pets and SFSes can be found on the Additional Software Sub-forum or by using the Well-minded Search. Always make certain that an application not included in a Pup's Package Manager will work with that Pup before performing a Save.

Lucid Revitalized uses older (smaller) graphics libraries which, consequently, require less RAM. The downside is that it can not run some newer applications such as recent google-chrome or Chromium. It can, however, run Palemoon which is a light-weight Firefox which can use most of the firefox addons I've found to be valuable. Additionally, to get No Automatic Save to function, you'll have to install shinobar's PupSaveConfig: http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=457081&sid=de76079e29d968dbb7954f770e1ffe7b#457081. After installing that pet, shutdown a couple of times and watch to see if it is still automatically saving. If so, see the thread cited above for the additional changes you'd have to make.

Carolina-Vanguard uses newer graphics libraries and so can run Chrome or Chromium. But its Devs have placed almost all “user” applications in a file starting with adrv and ending with sfs. Contrary to the instructions above regarding what files to copy from the ISO-Window, you need not copy that file. Without it, Carolina will boot to a “bare-bones” system into which your can install just those pets you want and load just those SFSes you want; in short, a customized light-weight Pup.

When possible, prefer SFSes to pets since, when not actually in use, SFSes require less RAM and can easily be unloaded which then uses no RAM. You'll find pets and instructions on the forum for converting most pets into SFSes, and combining several pets into one SFS to create application Suites you can load/unload as needed.

Last thought: By default, Firefox, Seamonkey will cache files to a hidden folder in your SaveFile. You can see it by opening your file-manager to /root. Using Rox, just click the icon on your desktop named files or home. Then click the “eye”. You'll see a file named .mozilla – note the dot. Palemoon does the same, only its hidden file is named .moonchild productions –again note the dot. If you're working with Carolina, its file-manager is Thunar. You can install Rox (recommended) or use Thunar's tools to “Show hidden files”. Cached webpages can quickly fill up the space in your SaveFile. To avoid that, the following workaround is recommended:

Open a second window to the same partition on which your Pup's files/folder is located. Right-Click, Select New>Directory and give it a name such as “Browser-cache”. Left-click to open it. Then left-click-hold and drag the hidden file from /root to “Browser-cache” and select “Move”. Show hidden files in Browser-cache. Then right-click-hold and drag the hidden file back to /root and select either Link (relative) or Link (absolute). Thereafter, webpages, cookies etc. will be cached to your SSD rather than your SaveFile. Despite this, it still is good practice to (a) configure your web-browser to clear history on exit and to periodically manually clear it.

For other advice as to how to keep your SaveFile slim and healthy, see shinobar's thread on that subject: http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=468769#468769

mikesLr
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
EEEpc_user

Joined: 13 Oct 2015
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Thu 15 Oct 2015, 09:59    Post subject: Re: Filling in some details  

mikeslr wrote:
...very detailed post...


Thanks for the very informative post, I appreciate your help!

mikeslr wrote:
...I hope you didn't take offense to BigPup's recommendation that you post your question here...


No offence taken, this was just a little advice that I followed. I already find this forum very helpful and friendly.

Here's my progress so far:

- Burned tahrpup ISO on DVD;
- Booted from that DVD on EEE pc (I have an external CD/DVD drive);
- Formatted both SSDs to ext2 file system. On the primary one (4 Gb) I've noticed a partition of unknown type about 40 Mb, I've decided not to touch it since I have no idea if it has any importance to the netbook;
- Installed tahrpup frugal install, grub4dos, saved my first session to file, rebooted, save file was loaded successfully;
- Checked a few things: ethernet, wireless, sound, built-in camera and built-in microphone are all working. Although microphone is awfully quiet, but I'm going to deal with it later.

EDIT: removed solved question.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
mikeslr


Joined: 16 Jun 2008
Posts: 3614
Location: 500 seconds from Sol

PostPosted: Thu 15 Oct 2015, 21:39    Post subject: Size of SaveFile  

Hi EEEpc_user,

Congratulations on getting things working.

I'd leave the SaveFile at its current size. As is, it's about 500 Mbs larger than the largest SaveFile I've had --even after a couple resizings-- in order to install every application I might conceivably want to use.

A SaveFile is a block of storage medium of a fixed size. There's a good chance that much of your current SaveFile will remain empty unless you save datafiles to it.

Linux Ext2 was a good choice as the SSDs' format because, I think, SSD's are more or less like USB-Keys. Ext2 is not journalized like Ext3 and Ext4. Journalization requires more writing to media. But according to mikeb --I'm not a tekkie, he is and I generally trust his advice-- Ext2 is more prone to corruption than Ext3 or 4.

So I'd want to make use of the SaveFile as little as possible: to preserve settings, and install applications which must be installed. One way to minimize the installation of applications is to download pets and convert them to SFSes. Tahrpup's Package Manager give you the choice to just download a pet. And there are other pets on the forum you might want which are not in Tahrpup's PPM. You can download a bunch into an empty folder and then uses RSH's PaDS to convert them into one or more SFSes, http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=658359#658359. About the only applications which will run as an installed pet but not as an SFS are those requiring frameworks like python. I suspect this has to do with the fact that the version of python required by such applications have to have "Priority" and "Priority" is given to the applications including python in the SaveFile and then to "builtins".

SFSes will be outside your SaveFile and need space on your Home Partition --the SSD on which your Pup is located. Your Home Partition is automatically and always mounted. Other drives must be mounted before they can be accessed. But you may want to install Startmount to automatically mount your other SSD. http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=377699#377699

If you are considering running XP programs under Wine, I strongly recommend the "Wine_MyPortable" from this thread: http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=755297#755297. It, and the programs you install into it, will also be outside your SaveFile and need space, preferably on your Home Partition.

But even if the above doesn't interest you, I do not recommend saving data files to your SaveFile. If for any reason you have a problem with your system a new Pup ISO can be downloaded, a new SaveFile can be created and stocked. But lost datafiles are lost.

Puppy and the applications which run under it can access both your SSDs and any USB-stick you plug in. My preference would be to create folders into which datafiles are stored. On my Home Partition I have folders I'm likely to access frequently. On a second Partition I have folders for things I may want to use in the future. Those folders I use most frequently I symlink to /root:

Browse to /mnt/home. Create a folder by Right-Clicking an empty space, select New>Directory and give it a name, e.g. My-Videos.
Open a second File-Manager window to /root.
Left-Click-Hold and then drag the My-Videos folder from /mnt/home to /root and select Link (relative).

Do that with as many folders as your needs and imagination require.

When you're running an application and want to save a datafile you've created, the first place it will offer to save it is to your /root, and will show those folders which appear in /root including --for example-- the My-Videos folder that you've symlinked to /root. Same goes for opening files in an application. Anything you've saved to your symlinked folder, actually is written to its real location --which is outside your SaveFile.

Folders outside your SaveFile initially use only the space necessary to signify their existence. They expand as datafiles are stored to them. No wasted space.

But more importantly, if my SaveFile somehow becomes corrupt, I can always access the datafiles using a different Pup if necessary.

mikesLr
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
bigpup


Joined: 11 Oct 2009
Posts: 13190
Location: S.C. USA

PostPosted: Thu 15 Oct 2015, 22:43    Post subject:  

Update Tahrpup so you have the latest bug fixes.

Click on Quickpet icon on desktop.
Quickpet->Info->Tahrpup bug fixes or tahrpup updates.

After all the bug fixes are installed, good idea to reboot so they all get saved.

Now start the Puppy Package Manager(PPM)
Should be offered the 6.0.2 or 6.0.3 service packs.
Install them.
Reboot.

Should now be totally updated to the date you did this.

_________________
The things they do not tell you, are usually the clue to solving the problem.
When I was a kid I wanted to be older.... This is not what I expected Shocked
YaPI(any iso installer)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
Display posts from previous:   Sort by:   
Page 1 of 2 [28 Posts]   Goto page: 1, 2 Next
Post new topic   Reply to topic View previous topic :: View next topic
 Forum index » House Training » Beginners Help ( Start Here)
Jump to:  

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
[ Time: 0.2080s ][ Queries: 13 (0.0077s) ][ GZIP on ]