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 Forum index » Advanced Topics » Additional Software (PETs, n' stuff) » Security/Privacy
dd, shred, dban
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labbe5

Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 1546
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Mon 12 Mar 2018, 21:51    Post subject:  dd, shred, dban
Subject description: how to securely erase your hard drives
 

https://www.addictivetips.com/ubuntu-linux-tips/ways-to-securely-erase-a-hard-drive-on-linux/

Each time you re-install Linux and format your hard drive partitions, the data on them isn’t fully purged. The reasons for this are complicated, but suffice it to say, anyone that gets their hands on an old hard drive that hasn’t been adequately erased can recover personal files and sensitive data.

The most common method for securely erasing a hard drive (aka zeroing) on Linux is done using the DD command. This method isn’t quick, but given the fact that every Linux and Unix system comes with the DD tool pre-installed, it makes this way of erasing a hard drive very accessible.

Another reliable way to erase a hard drive is with the GNU Shred tool. Like DD, it’s included on all Linux distributions in some form.

If DD and Shred aren’t good enough for securely wiping your hard drive, consider using the Darik’s Boot And Nuke tool. It’s a Linux powered open source tool that will delete anything and everything connected to your PC, as long as its running. Using DBAN requires a USB live disk.
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RetroTechGuy


Joined: 15 Dec 2009
Posts: 2912
Location: USA

PostPosted: Thu 15 Mar 2018, 12:27    Post subject: Re: dd, shred, dban
Subject description: how to securely erase your hard drives
 

labbe5 wrote:
If DD and Shred aren’t good enough for securely wiping your hard drive, consider using the Darik’s Boot And Nuke tool. It’s a Linux powered open source tool that will delete anything and everything connected to your PC, as long as its running. Using DBAN requires a USB live disk.


Dban is also good when you decide to "refresh" a hard drive -- reformat to use in a different system. I have a machine that I can pull all of the hard drives out, and only insert the one to be "cleaned"...

On old hard drives, this operation sometimes helps the hard drive's onboard controller to identify weak sectors on the platters, and relocates them to new media. (then, of course, a fresh format gives the drive another workout)

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Flash
Official Dog Handler


Joined: 04 May 2005
Posts: 13110
Location: Arizona USA

PostPosted: Thu 15 Mar 2018, 16:45    Post subject:  

Is this a good place to point out that if you encrypt your hard disc drive you don't have to worry about anyone else finding out what's on it, ever? No need to dd, shred or dban it before you sell it or give it away.
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peterw

Joined: 19 Jul 2006
Posts: 313
Location: UK

PostPosted: Fri 16 Mar 2018, 05:41    Post subject: Wiping SSDs - Don't use old overwriting tools.  

Adding to post by Flash. It is considered bad practice to wipe SSDs by zeroing, using DBAN, etc. There are two reasons for this:
1. SSDs have control processes inside them that change the place where data is stored to even out "wear" so that some of it will not be wiped and is available for anyone who wants to go to the trouble of getting it back.
2. Overwriting memory locations is said to "wear out" the SSD cells and unneeded writes should be avoided.

If you do want to wipe a SSD use the manufactures software for the task and since you use Linux you can also use the "hdparm" command. See: https://grok.lsu.edu/article.aspx?articleid=16716 for an explanation.
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Makoto


Joined: 03 Sep 2009
Posts: 2153
Location: Out wandering... maybe.

PostPosted: Fri 16 Mar 2018, 06:35    Post subject:  

Don't leave any extra spaces between the [url][/url] tags. For some reason, that causes the forum software to make the entire post look blank.
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bigpup


Joined: 11 Oct 2009
Posts: 11396
Location: S.C. USA

PostPosted: Fri 16 Mar 2018, 07:03    Post subject:  

Quote:
2. Overwriting memory locations is said to "wear out" the SSD cells and unneeded writes should be avoided.

A one time write of zero to all locations is only a one time write.
If that destroys a SSD. It is a piece of junk and should be destroyed.

Western Digital wrote:
SSD endurance is commonly described in terms of full Drive Writes Per Day (DWPD) for a certain warranty period (typically 3 or 5 years). In other words, if a 100GB SSD is specified for 1 DWPD, it can withstand 100GB of data written to it every day for the warranty period.


This is even more proof that one single zero write to all of the SSD drive is no big deal.
Experiment with intent to kill
Write to SSD's until they die! Shocked
https://techreport.com/review/27909/the-ssd-endurance-experiment-theyre-all-dead

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Flash
Official Dog Handler


Joined: 04 May 2005
Posts: 13110
Location: Arizona USA

PostPosted: Fri 16 Mar 2018, 08:59    Post subject:  

One big difference between SSDs and spinning HDDs is the "wearout" mechanism causes different failure modes. When a HDD fails, it usually does it suddenly and catastrophically. All its data are lost and gone forever, unrecoverable by normal means. A SSD can fail in the same way of course, but supposedly its "wearout" failure mode will cause increasing read errors, more or less randomly distributed and normally correctable by the error correcting code used by all drives. Eventually the read errors will become so many that they swamp the ECC, but, for a considerable while, a SSD will give plenty of warning that it is wearing out -- if you're paying attention.
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