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 Forum index » House Training » Beginners Help ( Start Here)
Puppy as Primary Operating System
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Do you think Puppy is a good choice to save this old machine?
YES
100%
 100%  [ 24 ]
NO
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Total Votes : 24

Author Message
Flash
Official Dog Handler


Joined: 04 May 2005
Posts: 12668
Location: Arizona USA

PostPosted: Tue 04 Oct 2016, 11:50    Post subject:  

Hollipl, PAE won't do much for you if you have less than about 3.3 GB of RAM.
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hollipl

Joined: 03 Oct 2016
Posts: 13

PostPosted: Tue 04 Oct 2016, 17:47    Post subject:  

poorguy wrote:
Hey hollipl,

I'm using Puppy tahrpup 32bit (frugal install) as an everyday driver on an old Windows XP computer without any complaints.

I use Netsurf and for basic web browsing it kicks ass.
Here is a link to a Netsurf download.

http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?t=106016

The PoorGuy



PoorGuy, I tried to download the pet and it threw me a 404 page not found error.

So here is where we are at Guys.
Tahrpup is install to hdd, Sucessfully switched Desktop Environments to XFCE,swap partition is on and working, 48 something gig file partition is formated. Puppy has its own 10 gig *system* partition, but say when I download something in firefox, it seems to save it in puppys system partition download folder, not my large file partition. I want the biggest partition to be mounted at /home and function like LVM works on other distros. I'm a linux newb, sort of, but have tried many Distros and am not scared of some command line work, but I'm not exactly the best at explaining my problems in linux because I'm not sure what the problem is half the time. *sigh* Im happy to run practicly any thing but microsoft's crap, So if I can just get together a system me and my wife can use I'll be happy. She uses Windows every day at work, but I sat her down infront of the Tahrpup live CD and she was able to figure out how to do some light webbrowsing and such. I think She will like the XFCE environment better.

While I wait for an answer to the /home issue, I'm going to try to install the .deb download of Teamviewer, which would be useful when I have a decent Puppy guru to show me some stuffs.

Last edited by hollipl on Tue 04 Oct 2016, 18:48; edited 1 time in total
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LazY Puppy


Joined: 21 Nov 2014
Posts: 2007
Location: Germany

PostPosted: Tue 04 Oct 2016, 18:20    Post subject:  

http://smokey01.com/gjuhasz/packages/netsurf-3.5.pet
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RSH

"you only wanted to work your Puppies in German", "you are a separatist in that you want Germany to secede from Europe" (musher0) Laughing

No, but I gave my old drum kit away for free to a music store collecting instruments for refugees! Wink
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foxpup


Joined: 29 Jul 2016
Posts: 238
Location: europa near northsea

PostPosted: Tue 04 Oct 2016, 18:28    Post subject:  

edit: hi LazY Puppy, I was just typing this when you sent yours.

If I remember right you have palemoon for a browser in Tahr. (I threw it out because it needs SSE2 and I only have SSE on my machine). So where did you get firefox then?
Anyway, in any browser you can define the download map under Preferences (look under Edit or Tools or Extra).
I still recommend QtWeb, by the way.

/mnt/home/ is by defintion where the puppy files (vmlinuz, initrd.gz, main sfs, other sfs, savefile) are. So it is a bit like C in windows, if I remember well.
Where you put your data (D) doesn't really matter. But it is good practice to put it on another partition. (It's also good practice to regularly backup that partition and your savefile if you have a frugal install, btw.)

/mnt/home/ always mounts at bootup because the distro resides there Exclamation
I always mount other partitions manually by clicking them on my desktop. I do not want everything 'open'. Windows does not require this.
To mount partitions on bootup, you could try Startmount.

I do not know teamviewer, but there are also puppy versions (pets) on the forum. (The deb from jessie or trusty should be alright also.)

Last edited by foxpup on Wed 05 Oct 2016, 15:12; edited 1 time in total
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hollipl

Joined: 03 Oct 2016
Posts: 13

PostPosted: Tue 04 Oct 2016, 18:46    Post subject:  

I was purposefully trying to install the .deb file to test puppys Ubuntu functionality. It has successfully been installed :]

Teamviewer is a Remote Desktop application that can be used for yourself, to easily control your computer from your phone while you are away,
or you can give a temporary ID to a friend, or even someone helping you on a forum, and they can see your desktop and show you how to fix problems, but you still maintain complete control and can cut the connection at any time. The Temporary ID is regenerated fresh each time the program starts so its never the same, and people can only use an ID and password to access 1 time, unless you give them the new one.
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foxpup


Joined: 29 Jul 2016
Posts: 238
Location: europa near northsea

PostPosted: Tue 04 Oct 2016, 19:03    Post subject:  

I think you can take slackware packages too, and perhaps others.
You should look that the versions of the required libs correspond more or less with those of your puppy. (You could also compare kernel versions.)
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foxpup


Joined: 29 Jul 2016
Posts: 238
Location: europa near northsea

PostPosted: Tue 04 Oct 2016, 19:06    Post subject:  

Quote:
to easily control your computer from your phone while you are away

Why do you want that. I never leave my computer on when I leave.
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LazY Puppy


Joined: 21 Nov 2014
Posts: 2007
Location: Germany

PostPosted: Tue 04 Oct 2016, 20:37    Post subject:  

Quote:
If I remember right you have palemoon for a browser in Tahr. (I threw it out because it needs SSE2 and I only have SSE on my machine).

Throwing out anything being placed inside the puppy main sfs (e.g.: tahr_6.0.2.sfs) doesn't make any sense unless you did a remaster after the removal.

Otherwise it (e.g.: Pale Moon Browser) remains inside the puppy's main sfs and it is only marked as "deleted" or "removed".

You can check this at /initrd/pup_ro2/opt/ - there should be still directory: palemoon, but in /opt there should NOT be a directory: palemoon.

_________________
RSH

"you only wanted to work your Puppies in German", "you are a separatist in that you want Germany to secede from Europe" (musher0) Laughing

No, but I gave my old drum kit away for free to a music store collecting instruments for refugees! Wink
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hollipl

Joined: 03 Oct 2016
Posts: 13

PostPosted: Tue 04 Oct 2016, 21:42    Post subject: Screen Timeout Issue
Subject description: Display continues to go blank
 

Okay guys Ran into first issue. No matter what I do, even tried xset s off on command line, The display still blanks itself off to a black screen every 5 minutes or so unless I move the mouse, even when I'm watching a movie or youtube video full screen, which is annoying... Why can nothing seem to keep the screen alive and how do I fix this.. Tried power options as well..
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Semme


Joined: 07 Aug 2011
Posts: 7775
Location: World_Hub

PostPosted: Tue 04 Oct 2016, 21:55    Post subject:  

Try "pupx" from a shell.
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mikeslr


Joined: 16 Jun 2008
Posts: 1927
Location: 500 seconds from Sol

PostPosted: Tue 04 Oct 2016, 21:56    Post subject:  

hollipl wrote:


... but say when I download something in firefox, it seems to save it in puppys system partition download folder, not my large file partition...


Hi hollipi,

However you install a Puppy, it operates such that initially every change takes place in RAM. Using firefox, it will automatically create a folder named "Downloads" the first time you download a file into which it will place the downloaded file. In Linux Distros, such as debian, which are designed to occupy an entire partition, such Download folder would be created in the User's Home Folder. But Puppies run as root, so it is created in the /root folder. You can see it by opening Thunar or Rox to that folder. And you're correct, it would be part of Puppy's system.

I'm not certain how you installed "Puppy", whether it was a Frugal Install or a Full Install. If you used Puppy Installer, you made the choice. The name Frugal is misleading, but the alternate name "co-existent" never caught on. Frugal is not a "cut-down" version: it offers the same applications a Full. It just doesn't require an entire partition and so can "co-exist" on the same partition as another OS, enabling you to frugally use that partition.

With a Frugal Tahrpup, you have the choice of saving your changes --settings, installed applications-- in either one compressed file whose size you have to specify, but which can be "resized" later, or in an uncompressed folder which takes up only a couple of bytes when created but expands as needed (to all otherwise unused space on its partition, if necessary) as you install applications and change settings. A SaveFolder is the recommended choice.

As you have 1 Gb of RAM and can run Tahrpup easily, there is no advantage if you chose a Full Install. One of the disadvantages of a Full install is that applications you install --and crap you acquired while surfing the web-- will automatically be written to your hard-drive. Uninstalling the former may break applications or your system. And the later may be hidden and thus un-removable. With a Frugal Install, you can set Tahrpup up to only write to your hard-drive on command. See this thread: http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?t=81911&start=60. If your create/store data files on your hard-drive, the programs manipulating them will automatically write to the hard-drive. Frugal installs also enable you to use SFSes. Those are entire applications you can load-and-unload-on-the-fly. A loaded SFS not in use takes up little RAM. Unloaded, it takes up none.

You can test how well a Frugal Install works without removing your current installation. Merely create a folder with a unique name, maybe "tahrpup32" --without the quotes. Then open your file-manager to where ever you've stored the tahrpup 6.0.5 ISO. Left-click the ISO and a window will open showing you its contents. Place your mouse-cursor on any of the following files, and Ctrl-Left-Click it; then Ctrl-Left-Click the others: initrd,gz, vmlinuz, puppy_tahr_6.0.5.sfs and zdrv_tahr_6.0.5.sfs. All those files should now be highlighted. Without releasing your mouse-button, drag the last file you selected into the "tahr32" folder. The other files should accompany it automatically. Release the button and select "copy". Then Left-click the ISO again to close it.

The easy way to add your new version of Puppy to your boot menu is to run Menu>System>Grub4dos. Grub4Dos should create listing for both your old and new versions. Or you can edit your current boot menu. Ask for help editing if you want it. Either way, you'll want to edit your boot menu. Both Grub4dos and Puppy's installer will have recognized that your Puppy OS(es) were on a hard-drive and will have written boot arguments accordingly. You'll want to edit where it reads “atahd” to “ataflash”. See the above cited thread for further explanation.

If such Frugal Install isn't as, or more, serviceable than your current setup, you can simply delete the Frugal's Folder and remove the boot menu reference. Alternatively, if you find it more serviceable, you can delete everything not in that folder and leave only the boot reference to your Frugal install.

Frugal installs enable you to try out many different Puppies, DebianDogs and now rufwoof's Debian Frugal, http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?t=107483, all on the same partition and decide which OS(es) work(s) best with your computer and for your needs.

At any rate, to get back to your original issue, your Download folder is currently within Puppy's system files at /root. Open two file-manager windows, one at /root and the other at /mnt/home. If you haven't deleted Rox, use that file-manager for this operation. Place your mouse-cursor on the Download folder, Left-click then drag it to /mnt/home. Select Move. Then place your mouse-cursor on the Download folder again, Left-click then drag it back to /root and Select Link (relative). This creates a symbolic link. Even though Downloads is now physically on your hard-drive, Puppy and applications will "see" it as still being in /root. Firefox downloads will automatically be written to your hard-drive, by-passing RAM.

You can substitute your 48 something gig file partition for /mnt/home. But you may need to have that partition automatically mounted on boot up. Take a look at this thread: http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?t=50845. [Sorry, not sure as I only run Frugal installs, using either SaveFiles or SaveFolders with all the external folders they need being on their /mnt/home partition which automatically is mounted on bootup].

With the exception of /root/my-applications --which is actually part of your operating system-- you can use the same procedure with most files and folders located initially in /root. This is especially useful in preventing web-browsers from caching their files in RAM, reducing the available RAM for your own purposes. For example, firefox creates a folder named .mozilla for storing settings and bookmarks. It also creates another folder in /root/.cache for storing "temporarily" webpages, including the photos on them. This can quickly use up your available RAM. The "."'s indicate these are hidden files. Using rox you can see them by left-clicking Rox's Eye. In Thuner, I think you have to left-click "Show hidden files".

Hope this helps,

mikesLr
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poorguy


Joined: 13 Nov 2015
Posts: 263

PostPosted: Wed 05 Oct 2016, 09:16    Post subject:  

hollipl wrote:

PoorGuy, I tried to download the pet and it threw me a 404 page not found error.


4th post down.
http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?t=106016

working link.
http://smokey01.com/gjuhasz/packages/netsurf-3.5.pet
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rufwoof

Joined: 24 Feb 2014
Posts: 2143

PostPosted: Wed 05 Oct 2016, 10:46    Post subject:  

mikeslr wrote:
As you have 1 Gb of RAM and can run Tahrpup easily, there is no advantage if you chose a Full Install. One of the disadvantages of a Full install is that applications you install --and crap you acquired while surfing the web-- will automatically be written to your hard-drive.

Hollipl only has 512MB Mike. For a full install you ideally need at least a GB I'd say. 512MB would work provided you had a swap file/partition ... but would tend to be slowed down by swapping to/from disk.
Quote:
With a Frugal Install, you can set Tahrpup up to only write to your hard-drive on command

Except in some cases, such as when you load a PET and it uses the 'save' space as a work area.

The way I run Debian LXDE is I installed grub4dos, created a empty partition and use that partition for everything, grub4dos (menu.lst, grldr), the main filesystem (filesystem.squashfs) and as the save folder (partition). Nothing preventing that also being the location of a swap file either ... such as creating/activating a 1GB swapfile :

dd if=/dev/zero of=swapfile bs=1M count=1024
mkswap swapfile
swapon swapfile

You have to set that partition as being bootable such as in gparted, and also give it a partition LABEL of 'persistence' (without the quotes).

For the Debian LXDE I use I downloaded a CD from here http://cdimage.debian.org/cdimage/unofficial/non-free/cd-including-firmware/current-live/ that includes non-free firmware, in my case selecting the amd64 folder choice as my PC is 64 bit (use the i386 folder is 32 bit) http://cdimage.debian.org/cdimage/unofficial/non-free/cd-including-firmware/current-live/ select the iso-hybrid sub-directory and ... pick one. I went for the ....lxde-desktop+nonfree.iso type file to download.

Once downloaded then you need to extract the live folder from that iso to the HDD partition alongside grldr and menu.lst (grub4dos installed files).

Then its just a matter of editing menu.lst to use that, something like

title Debian Jessie Frugal RO
find --set-root /live/filesystem.squashfs
kernel /live/vmlinuz boot=live config nofastboot persistence persistence-read-only persistence-label=persistence quickreboot noprompt showmounts live-media-path=/live/ config rw
initrd /live/initrd.img

A second boot choice of booting read/write so all changes are recorded requires only the persistence-read-only boot parameter to be removed

title Debian Jessie Frugal RW
find --set-root /live/filesystem.squashfs
kernel /live/vmlinuz boot=live config nofastboot persistence persistence-label=persistence quickreboot noprompt showmounts live-media-path=/live/ config rw
initrd /live/initrd.img

Taking that a step further, you can extract all of the filesystem.squashfs to the save 'folder' i.e extract all of filesystem.squashfs to the / folder. You can't do that directly so first you extract to a new/empty folder and then move everything in that folder up to the root folder

cd live
unsquashfs -d tempfolder filesystem.squashfs

... and then open tempfolder in a filemanager window, ensure all files including hiddenfiles are highlighted/selected and drag/drop those to another window showing the / folder and 'MOVE'. tempfolder is then left empty and can be deleted.

With everything in the 'save folder' there's no further need for filesystem.squashfs so that can be deleted, but best to create a empty one in its place otherwise that could prevent sfs's from being loaded.

cd live
rm filesystem.squashfs
mkdir tmp
mksquashfs tmp filesystem.squashfs
rmdir tmp

With that further step you in effect have a full install that can be booted like a frugal where changes aren't preserved on disk, just recorded in memory .... which runs a lot faster. Or you can boot it read/write where all changes are preserved as and when made.

The final step is to adjust from using /live/initrd and /live/vmlinuz boot files to using sym links to those in /boot ... as that way any Debian kernel updates will be correctly installed/used. i.e. create initrd.img and vmlinuz as sym-links to the initrd and vmlinuz files (with longer file names that indicate the version numbers) in /boot and adjust menu.lst to use those sym-links

title Debian Jessie Frugal RO
find --set-root /live/filesystem.squashfs
kernel /vmlinuz boot=live config nofastboot persistence persistence-read-only persistence-label=persistence quickreboot noprompt showmounts live-media-path=/live/ config rw
initrd /initrd.img

title Debian Jessie Frugal RW
find --set-root /live/filesystem.squashfs
kernel /vmlinuz boot=live config nofastboot persistence persistence-label=persistence quickreboot noprompt showmounts live-media-path=/live/ config rw
initrd /initrd.img

Instead of the RW boot choice above, I've set mine to chain to the Debian boot loader, which I installed from within Debian

title Debian FULL Install RW filesys must be extracted (/boot/grub/menu.lst)
find --set-root /boot/grub/menu.lst
configfile /boot/grub/menu.lst
commandline

So no different to a full install ... except that its booted via grub4dos that chains to it. I use that choice to run updates, that otherwise might exceed available memory space i.e. written to disk as soon as changes made. Slow, but used relatively infrequently. For the rest of time I use the RO boot choice (faster), but where no changes are recorded. However you can link from that read only layer to the main save folder, for example I created a /Documents-Persistent folder and once booted I created a sym link to that from within /home/user folder, so that I have a Documents, Picture ....etc where changes are lost after reboot, but also a Documents-Persistent folder where any changes within that are preserved across reboots.

I also have a script that I can run that's very similar (a adjusted version of) snapmergepuppy, so I can flush all changes in a RO session to disk to preserve them simply by running that script.

If you only use programs from Debian repository and perform updates periodically i.e. in a terminal running as root

apt-get update
apt-get upgrade

then you'll have a very stable installation that keeps up to date, that in the above case can be booted read only so you can try out things and not save them ...etc.

Don't forget to set a root password i.e.

sudo passwd root

and enter a password of your own choice (you have to enter it twice).

Debian runs by default as 'user' not as 'root' which is safer, especially if you run a browser. LXDE is nice in that respect as its file manager pcmanfm includes a right click menu option to open a folder in a root based window. Which at first seems a bit weird to do after using puppy, but soon becomes more natural instinct.

I suspect that with a swap file created/used of perhaps 1GB size, Hollipl could have that running ok on that laptop. Can't say for sure as mine has 2GB (more than enough such that I don't even need to allocate a swap file/partition).

You can still load sfs's with that (when booted RO only) simply by dropping them into the /live folder. Any files with .squashfs suffix will get loaded at bootup in alphanumeric order. Or if you create a filesystem.module file in that /live folder then only the .squashfs files listed in that file will get loaded at bootup, in the order specified in that file. Personally I don't bother as its just as easy for me to load/unload stuff using Synaptic (from the Debian repository).

For completeness my /usr/local/bin/flush2disk script is attached below, which of course needs to be made executable in order to run. Other than that script the rest of my installation is pure Debian. Around 4GB in total space used (no swap file included) which I have installed on a 15GB partition.

Best of all worlds IMO. Stable repository with security updates quick to come through. And can boot frugal style where changes aren't recorded, except if you want them to be. And runs quicker as changes are recorded in memory instead of to disk. But can be booted to the equivalent of a fully installed Debian (which reminds me another change you should make is make the repositories inspected be a wider range i.e. /etc/apt/sources.list should look like

###### Debian Main Repos
deb http://ftp.uk.debian.org/debian/ jessie main contrib non-free

###### Security
deb http://security.debian.org/ jessie/updates main contrib non-free

If you intend to compile stuff then you should add the sources (src) to that e.g. maybe a sources.list content of :

deb http://http.debian.net/debian/ jessie main contrib non-free
deb-src http://http.debian.net/debian/ jessie main
deb http://security.debian.org/ jessie/updates main contrib non-free
deb-src http://security.debian.org/ jessie/updates main
flush2disk.gz
Description  /usr/local/bin/flush2disk
gz

 Download 
Filename  flush2disk.gz 
Filesize  3.6 KB 
Downloaded  26 Time(s) 
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hollipl

Joined: 03 Oct 2016
Posts: 13

PostPosted: Wed 05 Oct 2016, 13:58    Post subject:  

mikeslr wrote:
hollipl wrote:


... but say when I download something in firefox, it seems to save it in puppys system partition download folder, not my large file partition...


Hi hollipi,

However you install a Puppy, it operates such that initially every change takes place in RAM. Using firefox, it will automatically create a folder named "Downloads" the first time you download a file into which it will place the downloaded file. In Linux Distros, such as debian, which are designed to occupy an entire partition, such Download folder would be created in the User's Home Folder. But Puppies run as root, so it is created in the /root folder. You can see it by opening Thunar or Rox to that folder. And you're correct, it would be part of Puppy's system.

I'm not certain how you installed "Puppy", whether it was a Frugal Install or a Full Install. If you used Puppy Installer, you made the choice. The name Frugal is misleading, but the alternate name "co-existent" never caught on. Frugal is not a "cut-down" version: it offers the same applications a Full. It just doesn't require an entire partition and so can "co-exist" on the same partition as another OS, enabling you to frugally use that partition.

With a Frugal Tahrpup, you have the choice of saving your changes --settings, installed applications-- in either one compressed file whose size you have to specify, but which can be "resized" later, or in an uncompressed folder which takes up only a couple of bytes when created but expands as needed (to all otherwise unused space on its partition, if necessary) as you install applications and change settings. A SaveFolder is the recommended choice.

As you have 1 Gb of RAM and can run Tahrpup easily, there is no advantage if you chose a Full Install. One of the disadvantages of a Full install is that applications you install --and crap you acquired while surfing the web-- will automatically be written to your hard-drive. Uninstalling the former may break applications or your system. And the later may be hidden and thus un-removable. With a Frugal Install, you can set Tahrpup up to only write to your hard-drive on command. See this thread: http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?t=81911&start=60. If your create/store data files on your hard-drive, the programs manipulating them will automatically write to the hard-drive. Frugal installs also enable you to use SFSes. Those are entire applications you can load-and-unload-on-the-fly. A loaded SFS not in use takes up little RAM. Unloaded, it takes up none.

You can test how well a Frugal Install works without removing your current installation. Merely create a folder with a unique name, maybe "tahrpup32" --without the quotes. Then open your file-manager to where ever you've stored the tahrpup 6.0.5 ISO. Left-click the ISO and a window will open showing you its contents. Place your mouse-cursor on any of the following files, and Ctrl-Left-Click it; then Ctrl-Left-Click the others: initrd,gz, vmlinuz, puppy_tahr_6.0.5.sfs and zdrv_tahr_6.0.5.sfs. All those files should now be highlighted. Without releasing your mouse-button, drag the last file you selected into the "tahr32" folder. The other files should accompany it automatically. Release the button and select "copy". Then Left-click the ISO again to close it.

The easy way to add your new version of Puppy to your boot menu is to run Menu>System>Grub4dos. Grub4Dos should create listing for both your old and new versions. Or you can edit your current boot menu. Ask for help editing if you want it. Either way, you'll want to edit your boot menu. Both Grub4dos and Puppy's installer will have recognized that your Puppy OS(es) were on a hard-drive and will have written boot arguments accordingly. You'll want to edit where it reads “atahd” to “ataflash”. See the above cited thread for further explanation.

If such Frugal Install isn't as, or more, serviceable than your current setup, you can simply delete the Frugal's Folder and remove the boot menu reference. Alternatively, if you find it more serviceable, you can delete everything not in that folder and leave only the boot reference to your Frugal install.

Frugal installs enable you to try out many different Puppies, DebianDogs and now rufwoof's Debian Frugal, http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?t=107483, all on the same partition and decide which OS(es) work(s) best with your computer and for your needs.

At any rate, to get back to your original issue, your Download folder is currently within Puppy's system files at /root. Open two file-manager windows, one at /root and the other at /mnt/home. If you haven't deleted Rox, use that file-manager for this operation. Place your mouse-cursor on the Download folder, Left-click then drag it to /mnt/home. Select Move. Then place your mouse-cursor on the Download folder again, Left-click then drag it back to /root and Select Link (relative). This creates a symbolic link. Even though Downloads is now physically on your hard-drive, Puppy and applications will "see" it as still being in /root. Firefox downloads will automatically be written to your hard-drive, by-passing RAM.

You can substitute your 48 something gig file partition for /mnt/home. But you may need to have that partition automatically mounted on boot up. Take a look at this thread: http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?t=50845. [Sorry, not sure as I only run Frugal installs, using either SaveFiles or SaveFolders with all the external folders they need being on their /mnt/home partition which automatically is mounted on bootup].

With the exception of /root/my-applications --which is actually part of your operating system-- you can use the same procedure with most files and folders located initially in /root. This is especially useful in preventing web-browsers from caching their files in RAM, reducing the available RAM for your own purposes. For example, firefox creates a folder named .mozilla for storing settings and bookmarks. It also creates another folder in /root/.cache for storing "temporarily" webpages, including the photos on them. This can quickly use up your available RAM. The "."'s indicate these are hidden files. Using rox you can see them by left-clicking Rox's Eye. In Thuner, I think you have to left-click "Show hidden files".

Hope this helps,

mikesLr


mikeslr,

Thank you sir, for such a thorough post. I learnt ALOT about puppy in the few paragraphs you put together there :] That answers alot of questions that I didn't even know I had yet. I do believe I will try out a frugal install, as I do have an interest in trying the slackware version of Pup. see this is the type of guy I would give a teamviewer code and let him show me around the system, and have reasonable trust that he wouldn't screw me. PLus after he shows me anything, I could just wipe and do a fresh frugal install and put to use anything people teachme without leaving a backdoor into my system. Anyways, Mikex stick around I will probably have a few more questions for you lol. Starting with fixing this screen blank timeout issue.
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foxpup


Joined: 29 Jul 2016
Posts: 238
Location: europa near northsea

PostPosted: Wed 05 Oct 2016, 14:10    Post subject:  

LazY Puppy wrote:

Throwing out anything being placed inside the puppy main sfs (e.g.: tahr_6.0.2.sfs) doesn't make any sense unless you did a remaster after the removal.


You are quite right LazY Puppy. I did not explain how I do it.
I unsquashfs the main puppy sfs, delete manually what I do not want and mksquashfs what's left. Sometimes I add something, of course. It's a manual remaster.
By the way, I do not use compression when I mksquashfs because I have some working space (1G RAM/120G HDD) but I want more speed because my CPU is old (amd palomino from 2002, that is pentiumIII/XP generation).

I did not explain because I did not think hollipl wants to do something like that now.
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