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 Forum index » House Training » Beginners Help ( Start Here)
Wary HD install won't boot
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mdiemer

Joined: 14 Jul 2018
Posts: 56

PostPosted: Sat 14 Jul 2018, 15:56    Post subject:  Wary HD install won't boot  

New member, first let me congratulate the team on creating one of the most complete and powerful Linux Os I have ever seen, regardless of size. Amazing achievement.

I have PL Wary on a cd, which boots fine, except for some graphical distortion after it has been running for awhile. I tried installing it to a hard drive, and I can't get it to boot.

Computer specs:

Gateway G6-300.
Pentium II, 300 Mhz.
Motherboard: Intel E139761
384 MB RAM.
5 GB Master HDD, plus 30GB slave HDD.
Windows 98, which still works.
No internet (never been on it).

What I did: I installed PL to the slave HDD, after first partitioning it with Gparted. The partition was named sdb2, even though it is the first partition on the drive. It is about 5 GB. The second partition, sdb1, is about 23 GB. It has files from Windows on it (I used it as extra storage).To boot this drive, I go into bios and bump it up on the list.

Result: the computer tries to boot the drive, but it gets stuck at the old Y2K problem! I'm not sure if this why it won't boot, but I suspect there are other issues as well. For one, I don't think Grub is configured properly. I tried installing Grub4DOS on a floppy, but that didn't work. I installed Grub4DOS again to to the HDD, but I get messages about possibly needing to edit Menu List. This is getting beyond my abilities, however. Which is why I joined the forum.

So, that's about it. how can I boot from the HDD? I really like Puppy Linux. I have looked at a bunch of other light Linuxes, but either they are too much for this system, or they are too minimalist for my needs.

Thank you,

mike

Last edited by mdiemer on Sat 14 Jul 2018, 18:13; edited 1 time in total
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rcrsn51


Joined: 05 Sep 2006
Posts: 12276
Location: Stratford, Ontario

PostPosted: Sat 14 Jul 2018, 16:03    Post subject:  

Quote:
Gateway G6-300.
i386 processor, 300 Mhz.
Motherboard: Intel E139761
384 MB RAM.
5 GB Master HDD, plus 30GB slave HDD.
Windows 98, which still works.
No internet (never been on it).


The world is over-flowing with used computers that are better than this thing, and would be a better platform for Puppy.
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LeithR

Joined: 24 Jan 2011
Posts: 277
Location: Kemnay, Aberdeenshire/Scotland

PostPosted: Sat 14 Jul 2018, 17:06    Post subject:  

Does the partition you have the OS loaded on have the boot flag selected?
See Menu - System > GParted partition manager
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Keef


Joined: 20 Dec 2007
Posts: 909
Location: Staffordshire

PostPosted: Sat 14 Jul 2018, 17:29    Post subject:  

Quote:
I installed Grub4DOS again to to the HDD, but I get messages about possibly needing to edit Menu List.


You don't have to edit anything if you don't want to - it is just for a bit of tweaking if needed. Did you continue with the Grub4dos installation? If not, try again and go with the flow.
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mdiemer

Joined: 14 Jul 2018
Posts: 56

PostPosted: Sat 14 Jul 2018, 17:59    Post subject:  

LeithR wrote:
Does the partition you have the OS loaded on have the boot flag selected?
See Menu - System > GParted partition manager


Yes, I did put the "boot" flag on it.

Also, I should have stated that it is a Pentium II. I'm unclear about the i386 designation. I think I saw that somewhere during boot up of windows. But it is definitely a Pentium II, if that makes any difference. I amended the specs accordingly.
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Mike Walsh


Joined: 28 Jun 2014
Posts: 4026
Location: King's Lynn, UK.

PostPosted: Sat 14 Jul 2018, 18:38    Post subject:  

Hi, mdiemer. And to 'the kennels'.

Mm...

Quote:
Gateway G6-300.
i386 processor, 300 Mhz.
Motherboard: Intel E139761
384 MB RAM.
5 GB Master HDD, plus 30GB slave HDD.


Y'know, I hate to say it, but frankly, I'm amazed that even Wary will boot on that thing. Pentium II's ('cos that's what ya got) don't even have basic SSE instructions.....which are pretty much a prerequisite for running a browser. Any browser.

But then you say it's never been on-line.....

Will that continue to be the state of affairs? Are you intending to use this thing as an off-line workstation?

What kind of things did you have in mind to use Puppy for? Y'see, I have a nasty feeling that any additional apps you may want to use might also have problems with that MMX-only instruction set...

Any extra information you may care to impart can only help, because it'll give us a clearer picture of what you'd like to do. And unfortunately, I kind of agree with Bill (rcrsn51); there comes a point when you have to admit defeat with old technology, and upgrade (perhaps to some 'less-old' gear...like most of us 'reprobates' run! Laughing)

-------------------------------------------

There is tons of the stuff floating around out there, going for a song. I don't like to be the bearer of bad news, but you might be better off to leave this old lady to her own devices.

(I have a 16-yr old Dell laptop.....which does at least have the saving grace of being fitted with a Pentium 4. And that has SSE2s.....along with the ability of being able to use up to 2 GB of RAM.)

However; if you can perform a 'full' install to HDD, and get it running, then you should be okay. The normal way to run a Puppy is with what's called a 'frugal' install.....but because you are seriously RAM- challenged, the 'full' install is probably the more sensible option here.

(A 'frugal' install loads completely into RAM.....of which you don't have very much. The 'full' install, on the other hand, runs from the hard drive - like a 'standard' Linux distro - and only pulls into RAM what it actually needs to work with at any given moment.)

We need more info. (BTW, the Y2K problem was, to the best of my remembrance, usually cured by a BIOS 'upgrade'.

Quote:
When considering how to correct the Year 2000 problem, Gateway identified many options, including software fixes, hardware changes to RTC (real-time clock), and BIOS (basic input output system) changes. Software fixes were inexpensive, but they were not guaranteed to completely correct the problem. Changing the RTC would have increased the cost, and probably decreased the performance. Modifying the BIOS to correct Year 2000 date calculations proved to be a secure and practical solution.

Because operating systems generally access date information via the BIOS, correcting the BIOS would correct the OS system clock, which is the "point-of-truth" for software applications accessing current date information. In addition, unlike the RTC hardware, the BIOS can usually be upgraded easily. As a result, the BIOS became the most common focal point for addressing the Year 2000 issue, and the approach that "almost all" PC vendors have used. Ever since November 1993, Gateway BIOS chips have contained the necessary logic to compensate for the RTC's date-processing limitations, and to process the Year 2000 correctly. [What Gateway is admitting here, though, is that they do NOT support a four-digit clock in the CMOS/RTC.]



Mike. Wink

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perdido


Joined: 09 Dec 2013
Posts: 898
Location: ¿Altair IV , Just north of Eeyore Junction.?

PostPosted: Sat 14 Jul 2018, 19:24    Post subject:  

mdiemer wrote:
LeithR wrote:
Does the partition you have the OS loaded on have the boot flag selected?
See Menu - System > GParted partition manager


Yes, I did put the "boot" flag on it.

Also, I should have stated that it is a Pentium II. I'm unclear about the i386 designation. I think I saw that somewhere during boot up of windows. But it is definitely a Pentium II, if that makes any difference. I amended the specs accordingly.


PII-233 was what I ran puppy 412 on. It originally was booting with 256MB of RAM,
it ran better with the upgrade to 512MB.

Surfed the web using Frisbee to connect via an external wifi dongle. Even though the seamonkey
it came with worked ok, QTWeb web browser was faster because it used less system resources.

I remastered puppy 412 and have the .iso if you wish to try it, PM me and I'll get you a url to download.

.

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mdiemer

Joined: 14 Jul 2018
Posts: 56

PostPosted: Sat 14 Jul 2018, 19:58    Post subject:  

perdido wrote:
mdiemer wrote:
LeithR wrote:
Does the partition you have the OS loaded on have the boot flag selected?
See Menu - System > GParted partition manager


Yes, I did put the "boot" flag on it.

Also, I should have stated that it is a Pentium II. I'm unclear about the i386 designation. I think I saw that somewhere during boot up of windows. But it is definitely a Pentium II, if that makes any difference. I amended the specs accordingly.


PII-233 was what I ran puppy 412 on. It originally was booting with 256MB of RAM,
it ran better with the upgrade to 512MB.

Surfed the web using Frisbee to connect via an external wifi dongle. Even though the seamonkey
it came with worked ok, QTWeb web browser was faster because it used less system resources.

I remastered puppy 412 and have the .iso if you wish to try it, PM me and I'll get you a url to download.

.


What version was that? An earlier Wary? I'm confused by all the versions of PL. I see that it began with 0, then went 1-7. Plus the variants. I wasn't aware of all these different versions when I downloaded Wary, I just picked it because it was older than Tahr. But perhaps an even older one would be better?

Edit: I did a search and found this:

https://osdn.net/projects/sfnet_old412forever/releases/

there's a bunch of 412 puppies. so confusing!
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mdiemer

Joined: 14 Jul 2018
Posts: 56

PostPosted: Sat 14 Jul 2018, 20:29    Post subject:  

Mike Walsh wrote:
Hi, mdiemer. And to 'the kennels'.

Mm...

Quote:
Gateway G6-300.
i386 processor, 300 Mhz.
Motherboard: Intel E139761
384 MB RAM.
5 GB Master HDD, plus 30GB slave HDD.


Y'know, I hate to say it, but frankly, I'm amazed that even Wary will boot on that thing. Pentium II's ('cos that's what ya got) don't even have basic SSE instructions.....which are pretty much a prerequisite for running a browser. Any browser.

But then you say it's never been on-line.....

Will that continue to be the state of affairs? Are you intending to use this thing as an off-line workstation?

What kind of things did you have in mind to use Puppy for? Y'see, I have a nasty feeling that any additional apps you may want to use might also have problems with that MMX-only instruction set...

Any extra information you may care to impart can only help, because it'll give us a clearer picture of what you'd like to do. And unfortunately, I kind of agree with Bill (rcrsn51); there comes a point when you have to admit defeat with old technology, and upgrade (perhaps to some 'less-old' gear...like most of us 'reprobates' run! Laughing)

-------------------------------------------

There is tons of the stuff floating around out there, going for a song. I don't like to be the bearer of bad news, but you might be better off to leave this old lady to her own devices.

(I have a 16-yr old Dell laptop.....which does at least have the saving grace of being fitted with a Pentium 4. And that has SSE2s.....along with the ability of being able to use up to 2 GB of RAM.)

However; if you can perform a 'full' install to HDD, and get it running, then you should be okay. The normal way to run a Puppy is with what's called a 'frugal' install.....but because you are seriously RAM- challenged, the 'full' install is probably the more sensible option here.

(A 'frugal' install loads completely into RAM.....of which you don't have very much. The 'full' install, on the other hand, runs from the hard drive - like a 'standard' Linux distro - and only pulls into RAM what it actually needs to work with at any given moment.)

We need more info. (BTW, the Y2K problem was, to the best of my remembrance, usually cured by a BIOS 'upgrade'.

Quote:
When considering how to correct the Year 2000 problem, Gateway identified many options, including software fixes, hardware changes to RTC (real-time clock), and BIOS (basic input output system) changes. Software fixes were inexpensive, but they were not guaranteed to completely correct the problem. Changing the RTC would have increased the cost, and probably decreased the performance. Modifying the BIOS to correct Year 2000 date calculations proved to be a secure and practical solution.

Because operating systems generally access date information via the BIOS, correcting the BIOS would correct the OS system clock, which is the "point-of-truth" for software applications accessing current date information. In addition, unlike the RTC hardware, the BIOS can usually be upgraded easily. As a result, the BIOS became the most common focal point for addressing the Year 2000 issue, and the approach that "almost all" PC vendors have used. Ever since November 1993, Gateway BIOS chips have contained the necessary logic to compensate for the RTC's date-processing limitations, and to process the Year 2000 correctly. [What Gateway is admitting here, though, is that they do NOT support a four-digit clock in the CMOS/RTC.]


Well, it's like this: I was for getting rid of this thing. Although it did come with a bunch of neat CDs. Although never online, it gave us many hours of enjoyment and productivity. But, as folks have said, it's really old. The thing is, my wife won't let me recycle it, she keeps saying she's going to use it again. So I figured I would work on it a bit. I maxed out the ram at 384 ( it had 32). Then I decided to see if I could get Linux going on it, to take advantage of the tools it has. For example, Windows 98 won't recognize my 8GB usb 2. but Linus does, so I can use it to quickly copy files like letters and docs, so e can put them on another computer. And I can run Gparted and partition and format drives.

PL Wary live CD runs quite well, except for the graphical issues during certain tasks (like attempting to make a system image using the dd feature). but if I could get it installed, maybe that wouldn't happen. Part of it also is that I'm retired, and it gives me something to do, and I'll learn something regardless of the outcome.

We will not be taking it online, so we don't even need a browser. I guess a bare-bones version would be fine, as long as it has a GUI. While I'm not afraid of the terminal, I'm not very proficient with it either.


Mike. Wink
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mikeslr


Joined: 16 Jun 2008
Posts: 2525
Location: 500 seconds from Sol

PostPosted: Sat 14 Jul 2018, 20:52    Post subject: Puppy for Pentium II computer  

Hi mdiemer,

rcrsn51 and Mike Walsh have accurately described the downside of trying to get a Pentium II computer to do anything with even what are now "old" Puppies. Certainly, you'll find it impossible to access the web (except maybe with a text-only browser, FWTW, and of which I have no knowledge). But there was a time when Puppies were created for such computers. Such Puppies might be serviceable, provided that accessing the Web is not one of the services you insist on.

I was hoping that LegacyOS, formerly known as Teenpup, might run under a Pentium II, but I couldn't find any post suggesting that it can. This is a beautiful, fully fleshed out operating system with applications to do anything you might want (except access today's internet). It was originally named Teenpup as John Biles created it for his teenagers. You can find out more about it and obtain a copy here: http://puppylinux.org/wikka/LegacyOS. That, however, was the last version created with Pentium 4 as a target. Perhaps an earlier version you'll find here might work. https://archive.org/details/Puppy_Linux_teenpup

Plugging the search term "Pentium II" into the Puppy-dedicated search site, https://cse.google.com/cse?cx=015995643981050743583%3Aabvzbibgzxo&q=#gsc.tab=0, generated this post, http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=481633#481633. "google-translate" revealed that the poster, dealora, recommends Puppy Linux 2.14X for Pentium IIs, as that version has 300 pages of posts and a multitude of applications which can be installed. This is Tuuxxx's Classic Puppy, a then updated version of Puppy 2.

You'll find those posts and links to ISOs here:http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?t=42553. Probably the other pets you find here, http://distro.ibiblio.org/puppylinux/pet_packages-2/ will function, the catch being that if you don't recognize the name of a pet make certain you know what its for before installing it.

If I read you're post correctly, you burned Wary to a CD, which you then ran from the CD and used "Universal Installer" to install it to the 2nd partition of your 2nd hard-drive (not partition) which, although a "Slave" is set to have boot-priority over your first (Master) drive. sdb is your 2nd hard-drive, and it's been partitioned so that sdb1 contains files relating to Windows 98, while sdb2 is where you installed Wary. Did you format sdb2 as Linux? Did you set the flag for sdb1 as bootable? Did you select a "Full Install" rather than "Frugal". With only 384 Mbs of RAM, and only a Pentium II processor, this is one of the few circumstances where even I recommend a Full Install. But that requires a Linux formatted partition.

Grub4dos does not recognize "partitions". It see only drives. Consequently, it would only have offered sda and sdb as locations for installation. And, as sdb has boot priority, and gparted recognizes it has having two partitions, you want to set the boot flag on sdb1. After using gparted, you'll also want to unmount the partition on which you intend to install it. Grub4dos can't write to a mounted partition.

While you're running gparted, you may want to examine both sda and sdb. With only 384 Mbs of RAM, a Swap partition may help to run Puppy and its applications quicker. gparted can create it on any drive, and regardless of where it's located, Puppy --any Linux-- will find it on bootup and thereafter use it if RAM becomes filled. A couple hundred Mb Swap drive can't hurt.

After choosing a Puppy which works on a Pentium II computer, properly formatting your drive, and setting the proper partition as the boot partition, as Keef said, run grub4dos again and "go with the flow".

mikesLr
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mdiemer

Joined: 14 Jul 2018
Posts: 56

PostPosted: Sat 14 Jul 2018, 21:41    Post subject: Re: Puppy for Pentium II computer  

mikeslr wrote:
Hi mdiemer,

rcrsn51 and Mike Walsh have accurately described the downside of trying to get a Pentium II computer to do anything with even what are now "old" Puppies. Certainly, you'll find it impossible to access the web (except maybe with a text-only browser, FWTW, and of which I have no knowledge). But there was a time when Puppies were created for such computers. Such Puppies might be serviceable, provided that accessing the Web is not one of the services you insist on.

I was hoping that LegacyOS, formerly known as Teenpup, might run under a Pentium II, but I couldn't find any post suggesting that it can. This is a beautiful, fully fleshed out operating system with applications to do anything you might want (except access today's internet). It was originally named Teenpup as John Biles created it for his teenagers. You can find out more about it and obtain a copy here: http://puppylinux.org/wikka/LegacyOS. That, however, was the last version created with Pentium 4 as a target. Perhaps an earlier version you'll find here might work. https://archive.org/details/Puppy_Linux_teenpup

Plugging the search term "Pentium II" into the Puppy-dedicated search site, https://cse.google.com/cse?cx=015995643981050743583%3Aabvzbibgzxo&q=#gsc.tab=0, generated this post, http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=481633#481633. "google-translate" revealed that the poster, dealora, recommends Puppy Linux 2.14X for Pentium IIs, as that version has 300 pages of posts and a multitude of applications which can be installed. This is Tuuxxx's Classic Puppy, a then updated version of Puppy 2.

You'll find those posts and links to ISOs here:http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?t=42553. Probably the other pets you find here, http://distro.ibiblio.org/puppylinux/pet_packages-2/ will function, the catch being that if you don't recognize the name of a pet make certain you know what its for before installing it.

If I read you're post correctly, you burned Wary to a CD, which you then ran from the CD and used "Universal Installer" to install it to the 2nd partition of your 2nd hard-drive (not partition) which, although a "Slave" is set to have boot-priority over your first (Master) drive. sdb is your 2nd hard-drive, and it's been partitioned so that sdb1 contains files relating to Windows 98, while sdb2 is where you installed Wary. Did you format sdb2 as Linux? Did you set the flag for sdb1 as bootable? Did you select a "Full Install" rather than "Frugal". With only 384 Mbs of RAM, and only a Pentium II processor, this is one of the few circumstances where even I recommend a Full Install. But that requires a Linux formatted partition.

Grub4dos does not recognize "partitions". It see only drives. Consequently, it would only have offered sda and sdb as locations for installation. And, as sdb has boot priority, and gparted recognizes it has having two partitions, you want to set the boot flag on sdb1. After using gparted, you'll also want to unmount the partition on which you intend to install it. Grub4dos can't write to a mounted partition.

While you're running gparted, you may want to examine both sda and sdb. With only 384 Mbs of RAM, a Swap partition may help to run Puppy and its applications quicker. gparted can create it on any drive, and regardless of where it's located, Puppy --any Linux-- will find it on bootup and thereafter use it if RAM becomes filled. A couple hundred Mb Swap drive can't hurt.

After choosing a Puppy which works on a Pentium II computer, properly formatting your drive, and setting the proper partition as the boot partition, as Keef said, run grub4dos again and "go with the flow".

mikesLr


Thanks Mike. (By the way, We used to have a cat that looked just like your avatar, named Checkers. He was an 18 pounder, and was rather dangerous at first, until he started mellowing with age. He was quite a character).

To answer some of your questions, I did format sdb2 to ext2, and put the boot flag there. And yes it was a full install.

I will set the boot flag to sdb1, and make a swap of 200 MB as suggested. For now I'll stick with Wary and see how things go.

Edit: I forgot, you asked about internet - no we will not be taking this online.
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perdido


Joined: 09 Dec 2013
Posts: 898
Location: ¿Altair IV , Just north of Eeyore Junction.?

PostPosted: Sat 14 Jul 2018, 22:35    Post subject:  

mdiemer wrote:
perdido wrote:
mdiemer wrote:
LeithR wrote:
Does the partition you have the OS loaded on have the boot flag selected?
See Menu - System > GParted partition manager


Yes, I did put the "boot" flag on it.

Also, I should have stated that it is a Pentium II. I'm unclear about the i386 designation. I think I saw that somewhere during boot up of windows. But it is definitely a Pentium II, if that makes any difference. I amended the specs accordingly.


PII-233 was what I ran puppy 412 on. It originally was booting with 256MB of RAM,
it ran better with the upgrade to 512MB.

Surfed the web using Frisbee to connect via an external wifi dongle. Even though the seamonkey
it came with worked ok, QTWeb web browser was faster because it used less system resources.

I remastered puppy 412 and have the .iso if you wish to try it, PM me and I'll get you a url to download.

.


What version was that? An earlier Wary? I'm confused by all the versions of PL. I see that it began with 0, then went 1-7. Plus the variants. I wasn't aware of all these different versions when I downloaded Wary, I just picked it because it was older than Tahr. But perhaps an even older one would be better?

Edit: I did a search and found this:

https://osdn.net/projects/sfnet_old412forever/releases/

there's a bunch of 412 puppies. so confusing!

The link you posted is maintained by darry19662018 I believe.
Lots of good stuff there, he is quite a fanatic Smile

Look here for more of the latest info about puppy 412
https://412collection.neocities.org/

That website is maintained by dave64 and mikeb. There you will find 412 everything.
"Puppy Linux 412 is an operating system compatible with many vintage computers, including AMD K6
and Intel Pentium II-era machines. Operating systems and software are hosted here in 412 Collection. "

You can go online with it, using your PII. I am posting with pup412 right now using QTWeb 3.8.4 full graphics,
logged in, etc. Anyone that says it can't be done is misinformed. But you will not be able to watch movies on youtube Very Happy

As far as your Wary install to HDD, some hard drives do not play well with each other. The HDD BIOS
could be not compatible between drives, especially if the drives are different brands or different sizes.
You could try unplugging your master drive (eliminating it) and set your jumpers on the slave to master
and see if it boots. If taking the master out of the system makes the slave boot then its just hardware.

.

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Mike Walsh


Joined: 28 Jun 2014
Posts: 4026
Location: King's Lynn, UK.

PostPosted: Sun 15 Jul 2018, 07:35    Post subject:  

@ mdiemer:-

Sounds like Tuxxx's 2.14 or Puppy 4.12 might be your best bet. These guys know more about the older Pups than I do.....the oldest Pup I run is Racy 5.5 (think 'souped-up' Wary).....but that's on an Athlon 64 X2 dual-core.

I have heard a lot of good things about 4.12, though.....despite the fact it won't run on either of my machines (seems they're too new for it!!)

Mikeb, one of our veterans, is pretty dedicated to 4.12.....and the other Mike is a gold-mine of stuff when it comes to the nuts'n'bolts of installing older Pups in peculiar ways that I probably don't even know about..!

We'll get you going one way or another; sounds like you've got plenty of time to play around with this stuff. Hang in there, mate. It's one of Puppy's strengths.....the fact there's a Pup to suit any age or type of machine, and most of them are still available for download.


Mike. Wink

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rockedge


Joined: 11 Apr 2012
Posts: 733
Location: Connecticut, United States

PostPosted: Sun 15 Jul 2018, 14:51    Post subject:  

I am running at the moment an IBM ThinkPad T-42 Pentium M, 512 megs of RAM .....no hard drive, no battery..long dead.....with Tahr 6.0.5nopae....using the one of the more recent palemoons. although facebook has begun to not parse so elegantly otherwise it goes okay.
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mdiemer

Joined: 14 Jul 2018
Posts: 56

PostPosted: Sun 15 Jul 2018, 15:40    Post subject:  

perdido wrote:
mdiemer wrote:
perdido wrote:
mdiemer wrote:
LeithR wrote:
Does the partition you have the OS loaded on have the boot flag selected?
See Menu - System > GParted partition manager


Yes, I did put the "boot" flag on it.

Also, I should have stated that it is a Pentium II. I'm unclear about the i386 designation. I think I saw that somewhere during boot up of windows. But it is definitely a Pentium II, if that makes any difference. I amended the specs accordingly.


PII-233 was what I ran puppy 412 on. It originally was booting with 256MB of RAM,
it ran better with the upgrade to 512MB.

Surfed the web using Frisbee to connect via an external wifi dongle. Even though the seamonkey
it came with worked ok, QTWeb web browser was faster because it used less system resources.

I remastered puppy 412 and have the .iso if you wish to try it, PM me and I'll get you a url to download.

.


What version was that? An earlier Wary? I'm confused by all the versions of PL. I see that it began with 0, then went 1-7. Plus the variants. I wasn't aware of all these different versions when I downloaded Wary, I just picked it because it was older than Tahr. But perhaps an even older one would be better?

Edit: I did a search and found this:

https://osdn.net/projects/sfnet_old412forever/releases/

there's a bunch of 412 puppies. so confusing!

The link you posted is maintained by darry19662018 I believe.
Lots of good stuff there, he is quite a fanatic Smile

Look here for more of the latest info about puppy 412
https://412collection.neocities.org/

That website is maintained by dave64 and mikeb. There you will find 412 everything.
"Puppy Linux 412 is an operating system compatible with many vintage computers, including AMD K6
and Intel Pentium II-era machines. Operating systems and software are hosted here in 412 Collection. "

You can go online with it, using your PII. I am posting with pup412 right now using QTWeb 3.8.4 full graphics,
logged in, etc. Anyone that says it can't be done is misinformed. But you will not be able to watch movies on youtube Very Happy

As far as your Wary install to HDD, some hard drives do not play well with each other. The HDD BIOS
could be not compatible between drives, especially if the drives are different brands or different sizes.
You could try unplugging your master drive (eliminating it) and set your jumpers on the slave to master
and see if it boots. If taking the master out of the system makes the slave boot then its just hardware.

.


Picking up on your tip re: hardware, I just finished trying to boot it with various configurations (master drive unplugged, slave drive with different jumper and cable settings). Basically, I think I have determined it is not a hardware problem, as I can get it as far as I do by just switching which drive boots in the bios. Specifically, it gets to a black screen having to do with grub. If I hit 'escape,' I get 4 choices, like reboot, halt etc. So it is trying to boot, it really seems to be a software problem.

Perhaps Wary is just too much for this machine. But then, why does the live CD run so well? It is perfect, except on long operations like DD cloning, then it experiences some graphical distortion.

In any case, I have downloaded 412 from the links provided here, and will give that a go next.
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